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Pegasus in the Lab

Magma Poetry in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh

 

 

Read more about the collaboration here:
Poets and Filmmakers: from Page to Screen

 

 

Pegasus in the Lab

Film Poem by Marios Lizides after a poem by Ginny Saunders 

 


Pegasus in the Lab

Film Poem by Marios Lizides after a poem by Ginny Saunders

Marios Lizides: I consider poetry to be closer to filmmaking than prose. Through ambiguity and symbolism you are able to communicate with the audience on a deeper, more visceral level. Even though I had created a few works that could be termed abstract and poetic in the past, I found that there were differences in the poetry and film collaboration process. In my past films, I found that their atmosphere/mood materialised mostly during the edit. In this film-poem project I had the poem as a guide and its “mood” as a reference during the shooting of the images. The sound design was also approached differently, as the images gave me clues as to what kind of sound would amplify the mood.

Ginny Saunders: When I talked with Marios about my poem I realised that it could all be traced back to when I was a student in a Biochemistry lab practical many decades ago. We were handling lab strains of bacteria and being taught how to dispose of them safely. The lecturer said something casual like, ‘but even if they did escape into the wild, we’ve so disabled them, and made them so dependent on drugs, they wouldn’t survive anyway’. That had a profound effect on me—how we manipulate and exploit nature for our benefit and don’t give the natural world a voice. In my poem I finally gave the lab bacteria a voice! I loved the idea that Marios articulated his response to my poem by comparing it to his response to a song ‘Higgs Boson Blues’ by Nick Cave. In the video of the song Cave enters a darkened stage as if from a fiery hell and when the door closes it has a big X scrawled on it. That is exactly how I worry the human race reacts to some environmental exploitations.

As far as this collaboration is concerned, it is different to anything I have done before. I see Marios as the next custodian in this chain of collaboration. Just as I had my encounter with the page without the Harvard scientists breathing down my neck (not that I would have objected to a collaboration with them if they are listening), he must now have his encounter with the lens and make Pegasus in the Lab his own.

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Marios Lizides is a Cypriot filmmaker/photographer. His photographs have been published in literary magazines and his films screened at various festivals. He is currently working on his thesis film for his MA course at the Edinburgh College of Arts.

Ginny Saunders lives in Wiltshire amongst chalky white horses and enjoys writing about science. She has a PhD in Molecular Biology and last summer was Poet-in-Residence for St George’s Gardens, Bloomsbury.

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Magma Poetry in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh 

Read more about the collaboration here:
Poets and Filmmakers: from Page to Screen

Project Team

Magma Poetry

Stav Poleg, Co-Editor, Magma 71, The Film Issue

The University of Edinburgh

Institute of Academic Development:

Jennifer Williams and Lucy RidleyFestival of Creative Learning

Learning Teaching and Web Services:

Lucy Kendra, Open Media Project

And also:
Charlie Farley, Open Education Resources Advisor – open.ed.ac.uk

Emma Davie, Programme Director – Postgraduate Film, Edinburgh College of Art

Juro Oravec, President 2017-2018 – Edinburgh Movie Production Society

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